ozonebabys-temple:
LOTUS FLOWER SYMBOL MEDITATION 
A visualization practice using the lotus flower symbol involves bringing your attention to your root chakra, located at the base of your spine.
Imagine a seed there. Proceed to imagine a stalk growing upwards through the chakra line, root-sacral-solar-heart-throat-third eye-crown.
Upon reaching the crown chakra, located approximately 2 inches above your head, imagine the lotus flower opening and receiving the Sun’s energy from above.
This energy comes into the lotus, down the stalk, and then roots into the Earth.
Allow five minutes to complete this guided visualization. Afterwards you should feel connected to the earth below and spirit above.

source:/fineartamerica.com/products/enlightenment-cristina-mcallister-greeting-card.htmlhttp://

ozonebabys-temple:

LOTUS FLOWER SYMBOL MEDITATION 

A visualization practice using the lotus flower symbol involves bringing your attention to your root chakra, located at the base of your spine.

Imagine a seed there. Proceed to imagine a stalk growing upwards through the chakra line, root-sacral-solar-heart-throat-third eye-crown.

Upon reaching the crown chakra, located approximately 2 inches above your head, imagine the lotus flower opening and receiving the Sun’s energy from above.

This energy comes into the lotus, down the stalk, and then roots into the Earth.

Allow five minutes to complete this guided visualization. Afterwards you should feel connected to the earth below and spirit above.

source:/fineartamerica.com/products/enlightenment-cristina-mcallister-greeting-card.htmlhttp://

ozonebabys-temple:

A great Zen Buddhist master, who was in charge of the Mayu Kagi monastery, had a cat which was his true passion in life. So, during meditation classes, he kept the cat by his side – in order to make the most of his company. One morning, the master – who was already quite old – passed away. His best disciple took his place. – What shall we do with the cat? – asked the other monks. As a tribute to the memory of their old instructor, the new master decided to allow the cat to continue attending the Zen Buddhist classes. Some disciples from the neighboring monasteries, traveling through those parts, discovered that, in one of the region’s most renowned temples, a cat took part in the meditation sessions. The story began to spread. Many years passed. The cat died, but as the students at the monastery were so used to its presence, they soon found another cat. Meanwhile, the other temples began introducing cats in their meditation sessions: they believed the cat was truly responsible for the fame and excellence of Mayu Kagi’s teaching. A university professor developed a thesis – which was accepted by the academic community – that felines have the ability to increase human concentration, and eliminate negative energy. And so, for a whole century, the cat was considered an essential part of Zen Buddhist studies in that region. From the Book: Like a flowing river~ 
When I meditate I my cat  usually ends by my side, or in my lap,  as I sit cross-legged on the floor. I call this practice Cat Meditation. As others have said, cats don’t come looking for attention, they simply approach and settle in. It’s quite powerful. The cat’s purr has a healing vibration and I find it one of the most soothing sounds and sensations. What’s better than having a peaceful, warm and loving companion who is  an expert at meditation to accompany one’s practice? I’ve always been fascinated by how incredibly sensitive to energy, cats are.

 source: http://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g1066455-d2583483-r179764558-Gotokuji_Temple-Setagaya_Tokyo_Tokyo_Prefecture_Kanto.html

ozonebabys-temple:

A great Zen Buddhist master, who was in charge of the Mayu Kagi monastery, had a cat which was his true passion in life. So, during meditation classes, he kept the cat by his side – in order to make the most of his company. One morning, the master – who was already quite old – passed away. His best disciple took his place. – What shall we do with the cat? – asked the other monks. As a tribute to the memory of their old instructor, the new master decided to allow the cat to continue attending the Zen Buddhist classes. Some disciples from the neighboring monasteries, traveling through those parts, discovered that, in one of the region’s most renowned temples, a cat took part in the meditation sessions. The story began to spread. Many years passed. The cat died, but as the students at the monastery were so used to its presence, they soon found another cat. Meanwhile, the other temples began introducing cats in their meditation sessions: they believed the cat was truly responsible for the fame and excellence of Mayu Kagi’s teaching. A university professor developed a thesis – which was accepted by the academic community – that felines have the ability to increase human concentration, and eliminate negative energy. And so, for a whole century, the cat was considered an essential part of Zen Buddhist studies in that region. From the Book: Like a flowing river~

When I meditate I my cat  usually ends by my side, or in my lap,  as I sit cross-legged on the floor. I call this practice Cat Meditation. As others have said, cats don’t come looking for attention, they simply approach and settle in. It’s quite powerful. The cat’s purr has a healing vibration and I find it one of the most soothing sounds and sensations. What’s better than having a peaceful, warm and loving companion who is  an expert at meditation to accompany one’s practice? I’ve always been fascinated by how incredibly sensitive to energy, cats are.

 source: http://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g1066455-d2583483-r179764558-Gotokuji_Temple-Setagaya_Tokyo_Tokyo_Prefecture_Kanto.html

source: ozonebabys-temple:
"Dragon Mist" 
My destination is no longer a place, rather a new way of seeing.
~Marcel Proust 

source:http://suirebit.deviantart.com/art/Hall-of-the-Dragon-Mist-60983793

source: ozonebabys-temple:

"Dragon Mist"

My destination is no longer a place, rather a new way of seeing.

~Marcel Proust 

source:http://suirebit.deviantart.com/art/Hall-of-the-Dragon-Mist-60983793

Around us, life bursts with miracles—a glass of water, a ray of sunshine, a leaf, a caterpillar, a flower, laughter, raindrops. If you live in awareness, it is easy to see miracles everywhere.

Thich Nhat Hanh (via thecalminside)

ozonebabys-temple:
Facts about Elephants:
Predators: Humans
Swahili Name: Tembo or ndovu Scientific Name: Loxodonta africana Size: Up to 11 feet Weight: 31/2 - 61/2 tons (7,000 13,200 lb) Lifespan: 60 to 70 years Habitat: Dense forest to open plains Diet: Herbivorous Gestation: About 22 months

~~Elephants never forget~~
visit the sanctuary: http://www.elephants.com/

ozonebabys-temple:

Facts about Elephants:

Predators: Humans

Swahili Name: Tembo or ndovu Scientific Name: Loxodonta africana Size: Up to 11 feet Weight: 31/2 - 61/2 tons (7,000 13,200 lb) Lifespan: 60 to 70 years Habitat: Dense forest to open plains Diet: Herbivorous Gestation: About 22 months

~~Elephants never forget~~

visit the sanctuary: http://www.elephants.com/

happyvibes-healthylives:

Rice is one of the biggest staple foods in the world, feeding over 3 billion of the worlds population.There are hundreds of different varieties of rice available and endless ways to prepare them.(I have a post here talking about 4 delicious varieties ). But in this post I want to focus on the debate between brown rice vs. white rice. It seems these two are often compared when debating which one is “healthier”.White rice is thought to be “empty calories” and more related to weight gain so brown is seen as the better choice. But which one is better? Well the answer isn’t so simple. Lets start by looking at their nutrition stats.
Nutrient Breakdown:Since I had some in my pantry, I compared Lundberg Brown Long-grain Rice to Lundberg White Long-grain. Per serving, the white has 160 calories, 0g fat, 36g carbs, 0g fiber and 4g protein. The brown has 150 calories, 1.5g fat, 35g carbs, 3g fiber and 3g protein. When looking at those stats side by side they are quite similar. The only significant difference is fiber, but it’s only by 3g. Now when comparing the two in vitamins & minerals, brown rice does have the advantage there. It has more calcium, magnesium and phosphorus.(plus more). This doesn’t mean that white rice has none of these though. Many believe white rice is devoid of all nutrients, but it still has these nutrients just less of them in comparison. In fact, most white rice found in the grocery store has more folate than the brown. It still doesn’t mean white rice is that nutrient dense, but brown rice really isn’t either if you compare it to other foods like fruit and veg. 
So on a micronutrient level, brown rice appears a bit more nutritious than white. However their macronutrients are basically the same. But there is more to food than just nutrients. 
Context:It’s important to address the context in which we eat. We rarely consume rice by itself. It is usually a part of a meal accompanied by veggies, meats, legumes, nuts, sauces, fruit & etc. If you are eating a balanced diet with lots of variety, you don’t have to rely on getting your nutrients from rice. You are already getting all those vitamins and minerals elsewhere. There is no nutrient in rice that you can’t get from other sources of food. So you may not be getting much calcium and fiber in white rice, but you eat that white rice with some calcium&fiber rich kale and you’re good to go. See how important context is? 
Different Needs:Context also applies to the individual needs we all have. Everyone has different lifestyles and bodies that may benefit more from eating brown or white rice. It really does depend on the individual. For example, if you are someone with digestive problems like IBS, white rice would be the better choice.The bran and germ that remains on brown rice is harder to digest therefore making white the better option. If you are someone with a metabolic disorder or blood sugar issues, brown is the better option due to it’s fiber and slow-release sugar. But if you want white, be sure to consume it moderately with a source of fat or fiber to help stabilize blood sugar.If you are an active person, white rice is a good after workout carb to consume because it is a fast digesting starch. This is beneficial post workout to restore glycogen levels. Brown rice would be good pre-workout because its a slow release carb ensuring sustained energy. 
To Conclude:Which is best? On a nutrient level, brown rice appears to be the winner slightly. But we don’t eat nutrients, we eat meals in various contexts. Food is not inherently”good vs. bad”. When we start comparing foods in this way we can put unneeded guilt & stress into eating. If you like white rice, eat that. If you prefer brown, eat that. If you like both, switch back and forth between them so you can get all the texture,taste & benefits they both have to offer. Both are perfectly ok to eat depending on your needs.The takeaway here is to eat whichever rice you’d like and to stop looking at foods like they are isolated nutrients. It is a bit more complex than that. Personally, I like both.White rice is good in sushi or dishes with thick sauces like curries. I just can’t get on board with brown rice sushi. I’d rather enjoy brown rice in soups,pilafs and veggie bowls. I don’t eat rice often so when I do eat it, it’s a matter of what mood I am in rather than which has more nutrients. 
Eat a varied diet and you can enjoy whichever type of rice you’d like in reasonable amounts. You know yourself well enough to understand what your body needs. But don’t take my word for it- I’ve given you some food for thought. I have underlined click-through linked sources you can check out to aid you in your research. 
photo credit & recipes; Spanish style Brown Rice   Thai Mango Sticky Rice
Zoom Info
happyvibes-healthylives:

Rice is one of the biggest staple foods in the world, feeding over 3 billion of the worlds population.There are hundreds of different varieties of rice available and endless ways to prepare them.(I have a post here talking about 4 delicious varieties ). But in this post I want to focus on the debate between brown rice vs. white rice. It seems these two are often compared when debating which one is “healthier”.White rice is thought to be “empty calories” and more related to weight gain so brown is seen as the better choice. But which one is better? Well the answer isn’t so simple. Lets start by looking at their nutrition stats.
Nutrient Breakdown:Since I had some in my pantry, I compared Lundberg Brown Long-grain Rice to Lundberg White Long-grain. Per serving, the white has 160 calories, 0g fat, 36g carbs, 0g fiber and 4g protein. The brown has 150 calories, 1.5g fat, 35g carbs, 3g fiber and 3g protein. When looking at those stats side by side they are quite similar. The only significant difference is fiber, but it’s only by 3g. Now when comparing the two in vitamins & minerals, brown rice does have the advantage there. It has more calcium, magnesium and phosphorus.(plus more). This doesn’t mean that white rice has none of these though. Many believe white rice is devoid of all nutrients, but it still has these nutrients just less of them in comparison. In fact, most white rice found in the grocery store has more folate than the brown. It still doesn’t mean white rice is that nutrient dense, but brown rice really isn’t either if you compare it to other foods like fruit and veg. 
So on a micronutrient level, brown rice appears a bit more nutritious than white. However their macronutrients are basically the same. But there is more to food than just nutrients. 
Context:It’s important to address the context in which we eat. We rarely consume rice by itself. It is usually a part of a meal accompanied by veggies, meats, legumes, nuts, sauces, fruit & etc. If you are eating a balanced diet with lots of variety, you don’t have to rely on getting your nutrients from rice. You are already getting all those vitamins and minerals elsewhere. There is no nutrient in rice that you can’t get from other sources of food. So you may not be getting much calcium and fiber in white rice, but you eat that white rice with some calcium&fiber rich kale and you’re good to go. See how important context is? 
Different Needs:Context also applies to the individual needs we all have. Everyone has different lifestyles and bodies that may benefit more from eating brown or white rice. It really does depend on the individual. For example, if you are someone with digestive problems like IBS, white rice would be the better choice.The bran and germ that remains on brown rice is harder to digest therefore making white the better option. If you are someone with a metabolic disorder or blood sugar issues, brown is the better option due to it’s fiber and slow-release sugar. But if you want white, be sure to consume it moderately with a source of fat or fiber to help stabilize blood sugar.If you are an active person, white rice is a good after workout carb to consume because it is a fast digesting starch. This is beneficial post workout to restore glycogen levels. Brown rice would be good pre-workout because its a slow release carb ensuring sustained energy. 
To Conclude:Which is best? On a nutrient level, brown rice appears to be the winner slightly. But we don’t eat nutrients, we eat meals in various contexts. Food is not inherently”good vs. bad”. When we start comparing foods in this way we can put unneeded guilt & stress into eating. If you like white rice, eat that. If you prefer brown, eat that. If you like both, switch back and forth between them so you can get all the texture,taste & benefits they both have to offer. Both are perfectly ok to eat depending on your needs.The takeaway here is to eat whichever rice you’d like and to stop looking at foods like they are isolated nutrients. It is a bit more complex than that. Personally, I like both.White rice is good in sushi or dishes with thick sauces like curries. I just can’t get on board with brown rice sushi. I’d rather enjoy brown rice in soups,pilafs and veggie bowls. I don’t eat rice often so when I do eat it, it’s a matter of what mood I am in rather than which has more nutrients. 
Eat a varied diet and you can enjoy whichever type of rice you’d like in reasonable amounts. You know yourself well enough to understand what your body needs. But don’t take my word for it- I’ve given you some food for thought. I have underlined click-through linked sources you can check out to aid you in your research. 
photo credit & recipes; Spanish style Brown Rice   Thai Mango Sticky Rice
Zoom Info

happyvibes-healthylives:

Rice is one of the biggest staple foods in the world, feeding over 3 billion of the worlds population.There are hundreds of different varieties of rice available and endless ways to prepare them.(I have a post here talking about 4 delicious varieties ). But in this post I want to focus on the debate between brown rice vs. white rice. It seems these two are often compared when debating which one is “healthier”.White rice is thought to be “empty calories” and more related to weight gain so brown is seen as the better choice. But which one is better? Well the answer isn’t so simple. Lets start by looking at their nutrition stats.

Nutrient Breakdown:
Since I had some in my pantry, I compared Lundberg Brown Long-grain Rice to Lundberg White Long-grain. Per serving, the white has 160 calories, 0g fat, 36g carbs, 0g fiber and 4g protein. The brown has 150 calories, 1.5g fat, 35g carbs, 3g fiber and 3g protein. When looking at those stats side by side they are quite similar. The only significant difference is fiber, but it’s only by 3g. 
Now when comparing the two in vitamins & minerals, brown rice does have the advantage there. It has more calcium, magnesium and phosphorus.(plus more). This doesn’t mean that white rice has none of these though. Many believe white rice is devoid of all nutrients, but it still has these nutrients just less of them in comparison. In fact, most white rice found in the grocery store has more folate than the brown. It still doesn’t mean white rice is that nutrient dense, but brown rice really isn’t either if you compare it to other foods like fruit and veg. 

So on a micronutrient level, brown rice appears a bit more nutritious than white. However their macronutrients are basically the same. But there is more to food than just nutrients. 

Context:
It’s important to address the context in which we eat. We rarely consume rice by itself. It is usually a part of a meal accompanied by veggies, meats, legumes, nuts, sauces, fruit & etc. If you are eating a balanced diet with lots of variety, you don’t have to rely on getting your nutrients from rice. You are already getting all those vitamins and minerals elsewhere. There is no nutrient in rice that you can’t get from other sources of food. So you may not be getting much calcium and fiber in white rice, but you eat that white rice with some calcium&fiber rich kale and you’re good to go. See how important context is? 

Different Needs:
Context also applies to the individual needs we all have. Everyone has different lifestyles and bodies that may benefit more from eating brown or white rice. It really does depend on the individual. For example, if you are someone with digestive problems like IBS, white rice would be the better choice.The bran and germ that remains on brown rice is harder to digest therefore making white the better option. If you are someone with a metabolic disorder or blood sugar issues, brown is the better option due to it’s fiber and slow-release sugar. But if you want white, be sure to consume it moderately with a source of fat or fiber to help stabilize blood sugar.
If you are an active person, white rice is a good after workout carb to consume because it is a fast digesting starch. This is beneficial post workout to restore glycogen levels. Brown rice would be good pre-workout because its a slow release carb ensuring sustained energy. 

To Conclude:
Which is best? On a nutrient level, brown rice appears to be the winner slightly. But we don’t eat nutrients, we eat meals in various contexts. Food is not inherently”good vs. bad”. When we start comparing foods in this way we can put unneeded guilt & stress into eating. If you like white rice, eat that. If you prefer brown, eat that. If you like both, switch back and forth between them so you can get all the texture,taste & benefits they both have to offer. Both are perfectly ok to eat depending on your needs.The takeaway here is to eat whichever rice you’d like and to stop looking at foods like they are isolated nutrients. It is a bit more complex than that. Personally, I like both.White rice is good in sushi or dishes with thick sauces like curries. I just can’t get on board with brown rice sushi. I’d rather enjoy brown rice in soups,pilafs and veggie bowls. I don’t eat rice often so when I do eat it, it’s a matter of what mood I am in rather than which has more nutrients. 

Eat a varied diet and you can enjoy whichever type of rice you’d like in reasonable amounts. You know yourself well enough to understand what your body needs. But don’t take my word for it- I’ve given you some food for thought. I have underlined click-through linked sources you can check out to aid you in your research. 

photo credit & recipes; Spanish style Brown Rice   Thai Mango Sticky Rice

California

I think I’m going back to California
Somewhere distant and it’s all far away
It’s so far, it’s so far far away…

I think I’ll drift across the ocean now
Clouds look so clear in your eyes
Let me dream all my, let me dream all my friends…

infinitycat:

California // Mazzy Star

ozonebabys-temple:

Zen Habits Live Simply

image

  1. Do one thing at a time. This rule (and some of the others that follow) will be familiar to long-time Zen Habits readers. It’s part of my philosophy, and it’s also a part of the life of a Zen monk: single-task, don’t multi-task. When you’re pouring water, just pour water. When you’re eating, just eat. When you’re bathing, just bathe. Don’t try to knock off a few tasks while eating or bathing. Zen proverb: “When walking, walk. When eating, eat.”

  2. Do it slowly and deliberately. You can do one task at a time, but also rush that task. Instead, take your time, and move slowly. Make your actions deliberate, not rushed and random. It takes practice, but it helps you focus on the task.

  3. Do it completely. Put your mind completely on the task. Don’t move on to the next task until you’re finished. If, for some reason, you have no choice but to move on to something else, try to at least put away the unfinished task and clean up after yourself. If you prepare a sandwich, don’t start eating it until you’ve put away the stuff you used to prepare it, wiped down the counter, and washed the dishes used for preparation. Then you’re done with that task, and can focus more completely on the next task.

  4. Do less. A Zen monk doesn’t lead a lazy life: he wakes early and has a day filled with work. However, he doesn’t have an unending task list either — there are certain things he’s going to do today, an no more. If you do less, you can do those things more slowly, more completely and with more concentration. If you fill your day with tasks, you will be rushing from one thing to the next without stopping to think about what you do.

  5. Put space between things. Related to the “Do less” rule, but it’s a way of managing your schedule so that you always have time to complete each task. Don’t schedule things close together — instead, leave room between things on your schedule. That gives you a more relaxed schedule, and leaves space in case one task takes longer than you planned.

  6. Develop rituals. Zen monks have rituals for many things they do, from eating to cleaning to meditation. Ritual gives something a sense of importance — if it’s important enough to have a ritual, it’s important enough to be given your entire attention, and to be done slowly and correctly. You don’t have to learn the Zen monk rituals — you can create your own, for the preparation of food, for eating, for cleaning, for what you do before you start your work, for what you do when you wake up and before you go to bed, for what you do just before exercise. Anything you want, really.

  7. Designate time for certain things. There are certain times in the day of a Zen monk designated for certain activities. A time for for bathing, a time for work, a time for cleaning, a time for eating. This ensures that those things get done regularly. You can designate time for your own activities, whether that be work or cleaning or exercise or quiet contemplation. If it’s important enough to do regularly, consider designating a time for it.

  8. Devote time to sitting. In the life of a Zen monk, sitting meditation (zazen) is one of the most important parts of his day. Each day, there is time designated just for sitting. This meditation is really practice for learning to be present. You can devote time for sitting meditation, or do what I do: I use running as a way to practice being in the moment. You could use any activity in the same way, as long as you do it regularly and practice being present.

  9. Smile and serve others. Zen monks spend part of their day in service to others, whether that be other monks in the monastery or people on the outside world. It teaches them humility, and ensures that their lives are not just selfish, but devoted to others. If you’re a parent, it’s likely you already spend at least some time in service to others in your household, and non-parents may already do this too. Similarly, smiling and being kind to others can be a great way to improve the lives of those around you. Also consider volunteering for charity work.

  10. Make cleaning and cooking become meditation. Aside from the zazen mentioned above, cooking and cleaning are to of the most exalted parts of a Zen monk’s day. They are both great ways to practice mindfulness, and can be great rituals performed each day. If cooking and cleaning seem like boring chores to you, try doing them as a form of meditation. Put your entire mind into those tasks, concentrate, and do them slowly and completely. It could change your entire day (as well as leave you with a cleaner house).

  11. Think about what is necessary. There is little in a Zen monk’s life that isn’t necessary. He doesn’t have a closet full of shoes, or the latest in trendy clothes. He doesn’t have a refrigerator and cabinets full of junk food. He doesn’t have the latest gadgets, cars, televisions, or iPod. He has basic clothing, basic shelter, basic utensils, basic tools, and the most basic food (they eat simple, vegetarian meals consisting usually of rice, miso soup, vegetables, and pickled vegetables). Now, I’m not saying you should live exactly like a Zen monk — I certainly don’t. But it does serve as a reminder that there is much in our lives that aren’t necessary, and it can be useful to give some thought about what we really need, and whether it is important to have all the stuff we have that’s not necessary.

  12. Live simply. The corollary of Rule 11 is that if something isn’t necessary, you can probably live without it. And so to live simply is to rid your life of as many of the unnecessary and unessential things as you can, to make room for the essential. Now, what is essential will be different to each person. For me, my family, my writing, my running and my reading are essential. To others, yoga and spending time with close friends might be essential. For others it will be nursing and volunteering and going to church and collecting comic books. There is no law saying what should be essential for you — but you should consider what is most important to your life, and make room for that by eliminating the other less essential things in your life.

via ozonebabys-temple

Therapy in a tear

I have cried real tears almost the whole day….even in public, in a doctors office, in a grocery store…driving in the car….I didn’t care what anyone thought.

You know what?  I  feel like a huge weight was lifted off  of myself after months being pushed in different directions and having to deal this and that (that) life throws at you.

Think I might do it again tomorrow :)

ozonebabys-temple:

“The Paradox of our Times”
 Is that we have taller buildings, but shorter tempers Wider freeways, but narrower viewpoints We spend more, but we have less.
We have bigger houses, but smaller families More conveniences, but less time. We have more degrees, but less sense More knowledge, but less judgement More experts, but more problems More medicines, but less wellness.
We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values. We talk too much, love too seldom, and hate too often We have learn how to make a living, but not a life. We have added years to life, but not life to years. We’ve been all the way to the moon and back But have trouble crossing the street to meet the new neighbor. We have conquered outer space, but not inner space. We’ve cleaned up the air, but polluted our soul. We’ve split the atom, but not our prejudice. We’ve higher incomes, but lower morals. We’ve become long on quantity but short on quality.
These are the times of tall men, and short character; Steep profits, and shallow relationships. These are the times of world peace, but domestic warfare, More leisure, but less fun; more kinds of food, but less nutrition.
These are the days of two incomes, but more divorces; Of fancier houses, but broken homes. It is a time when there is much in the show window, and nothing in the stockroom.
A time when technology can bring this letter to you,
And a time when you can choose,
Either to make a difference …. or just hit, delete.”  
~Dalai Lama
 ozonebabys-temple
more:http://www.dalailama.com/messages/world-peace/the-global-community

ozonebabys-temple:

“The Paradox of our Times”


Is that we have taller buildings, but shorter tempers
Wider freeways, but narrower viewpoints
We spend more, but we have less.

We have bigger houses, but smaller families
More conveniences, but less time.
We have more degrees, but less sense
More knowledge, but less judgement
More experts, but more problems
More medicines, but less wellness.

We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values.
We talk too much, love too seldom, and hate too often
We have learn how to make a living, but not a life.
We have added years to life, but not life to years.
We’ve been all the way to the moon and back
But have trouble crossing the street to meet the new neighbor.
We have conquered outer space, but not inner space.
We’ve cleaned up the air, but polluted our soul.
We’ve split the atom, but not our prejudice.
We’ve higher incomes, but lower morals.
We’ve become long on quantity but short on quality.

These are the times of tall men, and short character;
Steep profits, and shallow relationships.
These are the times of world peace, but domestic warfare,
More leisure, but less fun; more kinds of food, but less nutrition.

These are the days of two incomes, but more divorces;
Of fancier houses, but broken homes.
It is a time when there is much in the show window, and nothing in the stockroom.

A time when technology can bring this letter to you,

And a time when you can choose,

Either to make a difference …. or just hit, delete.” 

~Dalai Lama

 ozonebabys-temple

more:http://www.dalailama.com/messages/world-peace/the-global-community

ozonebabys-temple:
"We laughed a lot. That’s one thing we forgot about for a few years - laughing. When we went through all the lawsuits, it looked as if everything was bleak, but when I think back to before that, I remember we used to laugh all the time."
George Harrison  1974~ From the Dark Horse video

ozonebabys-temple:

"We laughed a lot. That’s one thing we forgot about for a few years - laughing. When we went through all the lawsuits, it looked as if everything was bleak, but when I think back to before that, I remember we used to laugh all the time."

George Harrison  1974~ From the Dark Horse video